Posts Tagged ‘eating a food hamper’

Ten Days Of Food Hampers At The Food Hamper Program: Part Two

November 2, 2015

This is the second part of Chloe’s two part photo essay of food hampers at the Emergency Food Hamper Program.

In the first week, we saw the change of items from day to day as new items came in, and other items ran out. This post covers a busier period of time where we had different items in, and had to steward our resources carefully to avoid running out.

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Week of August 17th-21st

Every day these items were given out: One kilogram of meat, five pounds of potatoes, one can of soup, cauliflower (either as a choice or as the fresh vegetable given out that day), onions (either a bunch of green onions or a cooking onion), two boxes of Kraft Dinner, one jar of peanut butter (choice on size and flavour), one can of beans in sauce, a dessert of some kind (pound cake, cinnamon bread or individually wrapped cookies), bread (one or two depending on the day, various kinds), one carton of juice (various flavours, between 1L-1.75L), one container of Becel margarine (different flavours, between 1-2lbs), and one litre of milk.

Monday

  • Hampers up to that point in the week: 51
  • Hamper extras: One can of black olives, one can of corn, one can of peaches, one bag of Potato Thins crackers, two packets of Minigo yogurt, ½ a dozen eggs
  • Window extras: Choice between an avocado or lentil casserole, one watermelon, six ears of corn
  • Total Daily Hamper Count: 136

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Five days on a Hamper Diet: surviving, or thriving?

August 27, 2014

In two other posts, our intrepid summer students discussed “living inside the box,” including planning meals and dealing with the unexpected when your only groceries are from the Emergency Food Program. In this piece, Jessica shifts the discussion out of the abstract, describing her experience living on the actual contents of a food hamper, for five days. (She bought the items, don’t worry!) As her story unfolds, compare it with other more theoretical entries on this blog. Now, here’s Jessica!

My thoughts going into the assignment

In my last blog post I questioned the sustainability of our five day meal plans. In short, was it really enough food to eat well for five days? So, for this assignment I wanted to actually prepare and eat a single person family hamper. This Friday I am going to record what items would be in a one person hamper and purchase them at my local grocery store. I am only going to use the items that would be provided in the hamper with the exception of salt and pepper.

Going into this activity of actually executing a designed meal plan I was quite nervous. I was unsure of what to expect and what I would receive in my hamper that day.

Would I like the food options?

Would there be enough food to last the designated period of time?

I believe these feelings might be similar to customers who use our program, especially for the first time. This is why it seems so important to help program patrons feel comfortable and answer any questions they might have.

Now, I wouldn’t necessarily call myself a picky eater but there are some items that I would prefer not to eat. This makes me think of all the children that only want to eat certain food items like chicken nuggets and french fries. How do their parents or guardians handle that situation when all they have available is the food we provide them?

Although extremely healthy for you I’m a lot like most children and do not enjoy eating vegetables, maybe with dip but that’s about it. So designing a personalized meal plan for myself may be trickier than just a general meal plan Sarah and I created earlier where I didn’t incorporate my personal food preferences.

This assignment should be very interesting and a great learning experience for myself to gain a larger understanding of what some of our single person family customers may be going through when designing and preparing meals for themselves. (more…)